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By Washington Street Family Dentistry
April 14, 2022
Category: Oral Health
Tags: dentures  

If you are considering a denture, you might be wondering about the different options to choose from. What will work best for you? Which one should you choose? These are all great questions that Dr. Todd Manela at Washington Street Family Dentistry in Toms River, NJ, wants to help you with.  

You might need a new denture if you have missing or damaged teeth, or if you’ve worn a denture for a long time. Modern denture materials can provide a denture that looks natural and helps you enjoy the foods you love. The right new denture can restore your self-esteem and confidence too. 

A full denture is a great choice if you want to replace an entire upper or lower arch of teeth. If you need a full denture, you can choose from: 

  • An immediate denture, which is delivered immediately after your teeth are removed; this type of denture has the advantage of you leaving the office with a full set of teeth. After the area has healed completely, a second permanent denture will be made. 

  • A conventional denture, which is created and placed over healed tissue after 6 to 8 weeks; conventional dentures are great because you only have to become accustomed to one denture. 

  • An overdenture, which uses dental implants or retained root tips to provide support and conserve the bone in your jaws; the overdenture is simply snapped in place over the implants or root tips. 

A partial denture is the choice to make if you only want to replace a few teeth and not an entire arch. If you need a partial denture, you can choose from: 

  • A transitional partial denture, a great choice if you want to move on to dental implants and don’t want to live without teeth; transitional partial dentures are a temporary choice and are often less expensive. 

  • A removable partial denture, the perfect choice if you don’t want implants later; removable partial dentures are made of strong, sturdy materials that will last. 

You deserve a denture that enhances your appearance and your life. For more information about tooth replacement options call Dr. Todd Manela at Washington Street Family Dentistry in Toms River, NJ, today! To reach our office, call 732-349-0006.

By Washington Street Family Dentistry
December 21, 2021
Category: Dental Procedures

Although dental implants are designed to last years, they can become damaged. Fortunately, your Tom's River, NJ, dentist, Dr. Todd Manela of Washington Street Family Dentistry, offers implant restoration services that will help you protect your dental implants.

Implant damage causes

Your new tooth is made up of three parts:

  • The Dental Implant: This titanium post serves as the root of your tooth and bonds to your jawbone.
  • Crown: Your crown replaces the top part of your tooth visible above your gum.
  • Abutment: The abutment is a screw that connects the implant to the crown.

Damage can affect any of these parts, although problems with crowns and abutments happen more often than issues with implants. Wear and tear or grinding your teeth while you sleep can cause the abutment or crown to break or loosen. Grinding is also one of the reasons that an implant can loosen, in addition to infections and too much pressure placed on the implant before it fully bonds to your jawbone.

A chip in your crown or a broken or loose abutment could also occur if you eat hard foods, chew ice, or use your teeth to open packages.

If you notice damage to your implant or your crown or implant feels loose, call the dental office as soon as possible. While you wait to see the dentist, don't chew on the affected side of your mouth.

How broken implants are restored

Implant restoration depends on the type of damage. Your visit to the Toms River, NJ, dental office will include an examination and X-rays of your implant. If a problem with a crown or abutment is the issue, these parts may need to be replaced. Crowns don't last forever and usually need to be replaced after 10 or 15 years or longer.

If your implant is broken or no longer attached to your jawbone, it will need to be replaced. You may also need bone grafts to build up the jawbone that supports the implant. It takes several months for new bone to form around the graft. Once this happens, you can receive a new dental implant.

A nightguard can help you avoid future damage if you grind or clench your teeth at night. Your custom mouthguard is made from an impression of your mouth and fits over your teeth while you sleep.

Do you have a damaged or loose dental implant or crown? It's time to pay a visit to your Toms River, NJ, dentist, Dr. Manela to discuss implant restoration. Call (732) 349-0006 to schedule an appointment with Washington Street Family Dentistry.

By Washington Street Family Dentistry
December 11, 2021
Category: Dental Procedures
ARoutineDentalProcedureSavesThisMLBStandoutsBrokenTooth

During this year's baseball spring training, Minnesota Twins center fielder Byron Buxton got into a row with a steak dinner—and the beefsteak got the better of it. During his meal, the Gold Glove winner cracked a tooth.

Fortunately, he didn't lose it. Buxton's dentist rescued the tooth with a dental procedure that's been around for over a century—a root canal treatment. The dependable root canal is responsible for saving millions of teeth each year.

Dentists turn to root canal treatments for a number of reasons: a permanent tooth's roots are dissolving (a condition called resorption); chronic inflammation of the innermost tooth pulp due to repeated fillings; or a fractured or cracked tooth, like Buxton's, in which the pulp becomes exposed to bacteria.

One of the biggest reasons, though, is advanced tooth decay. Triggered by acid, a by-product of bacteria, a tooth's enamel softens and erodes, allowing decay into the underlying dentin. In its initial stages, we can often treat decay with a filling. But if the decay continues to advance, it can infect the pulp and root canals and eventually reach the bone.

Decay of this magnitude seriously jeopardizes a tooth's survival. But we can still stop it before that point with a root canal. The basic procedure is fairly straightforward. We begin first by drilling a small hole into the tooth to access the inner pulp and root canals. Using special instruments, we then remove all of the infected tissue within the tooth.

After disinfecting the now empty spaces and reshaping the root canals, we fill the tooth with a rubber-like substance called gutta percha. This, along with filling the access hole, seals the tooth's interior from future infection. In most cases, we'll return sometime later and bond a life-like crown to the tooth (as Buxton's dentist did for him) for added protection and support.

You would think such a procedure would get its own ticker tape parade. Unfortunately, there's a cultural apprehension that root canals are painful. But here's the truth—because your tooth and surrounding gums are numbed by local anesthesia, a root canal procedure doesn't hurt. Actually, if your tooth has been throbbing from tooth decay's attack on its nerves, a root canal treatment will alleviate that pain.

After some time on the disabled list, Buxton was back in the lineup in time to hit his longest homer to date at 456 feet on the Twins' Opening Day. You may not have that kind of moment after a root canal, but repairing a bothersome tooth with this important procedure will certainly get you back on your feet again.

If you would like more information about root canal therapy, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “A Step-By-Step Guide to Root Canal Treatment.”

By Washington Street Family Dentistry
December 01, 2021
Category: Dental Procedures
HeadOffaCrossbiteatthePassWithThisOrthodonticAppliance

At what age should you begin treating a poor bite? Many might say with braces around late childhood or early adolescence. But some bite problems could be addressed earlier—with the possibility of avoiding future orthodontic treatment.

A crossbite is a good example. In a normal bite, all of the upper teeth slightly cover the lower when the jaws are shut. But a crossbite occurs when some of the lower teeth, particularly in back, overlap the upper teeth. This situation often happens when the upper jaw develops too narrowly.

But one feature of a child's mouth structure provides an opportunity to intervene and alter jaw development. During a child's early years, the palate (roof of the mouth) consists of two bones next to each other with an open seam running between them. This seam, which runs through the center of the mouth from front to back, will fuse during puberty to form one continuous palatal bone.

An orthodontist can take advantage of this separation if the jaw isn't growing wide enough with a unique device called a palatal expander. This particular oral appliance consists of four, thin metal legs connected to a central mechanism. The orthodontist places the expander against the palate and then uses the mechanism to extend the legs firmly against the back of the teeth on both sides of the jaw.

The outward pressure exerted by the legs also widens the seam between the two palatal bones. The body will respond to this by adding new bone to the existing palatal bones to fill in the widened gap. At regular intervals, the patient or a caregiver will operate the mechanism with a key that will continue to widen the gap between the bones, causing more expansion of the palatal bones until the jaw has grown to a normal width.

The palatal expander is most effective when it's applied early enough to develop more bone before the seam closes. That's why it's important for children to undergo bite evaluation with an orthodontist around age 6. If it appears a bite problem is developing, early interventions like a palatal expander could slow or stop it before it gets worse.

If you would like more information on interceptive orthodontics, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Palatal Expanders.”

By Washington Street Family Dentistry
November 21, 2021
Category: Oral Health
FluorideTreatmentsGiveYourChildAddedProtectionAgainstCavities

When it comes to helping your child avoid tooth decay, it's all hands on deck. Tooth decay can not only harm their current set of primary teeth, but the loss of even one tooth could lead to bite problems later on.

And, even if you're doing all the right things—daily brushing and flossing, limiting sugar consumption and regular dental visits—your child might still develop cavities. If so, it may be necessary to add a boost of prevention with topical fluoride applied by your dentist.

With its enamel-strengthening properties, fluoride plays an important role in dental disease prevention. For decades, manufacturers have added fluoride to toothpaste. And, many water utilities now add tiny amounts of fluoride to their drinking supply.

According to a number of studies, these fluoride applications are effective weapons against tooth decay. But direct applications of fluoride to tooth surfaces can provide even greater benefit to children with a higher susceptibility for decay.

Topical fluoride is usually applied by means of a gel, foam or varnish. In varnish form, it's brushed on the teeth, while dentists apply the foam solution within a tray fitted around the teeth. The gel application can be administered by either method.

Although these topical applications use a higher concentration of fluoride than you find in toothpaste, it poses no serious danger to a child's health. But because high doses of fluoride can lead to staining, topical applications are only administered periodically during childhood.

The only short-term health concern is if the child accidentally swallows some of the mixture during application. This can cause symptoms like an upset stomach, vomiting or headache. Dentists, however, take a number of precautions to prevent accidental ingestion in order to avoid these unpleasant side effects.

The benefits, though, appear to well outweigh this minor risk. In a review of several scientific studies involving nearly 10,000 children, there was an average 28% reduction in decayed, missing or filled teeth in those children that underwent topical fluoride treatments.

If you want to know more about topical fluoride treatments and whether they can help your child avoid tooth decay, talk to your dentist. This fluoride booster could help further protect them from this destructive dental disease.

If you would like more information on helping your child avoid tooth decay, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Fluoride Gels Reduce Decay.”





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